Nutrition

A nutrient-dense super food, beans contain protein, energy packed complex carbohydrates, antioxidants and phytochemicals, as well as important vitamins and minerals such as folate, manganese, potassium, iron, phosphorous, copper, and magnesium. Unlike meat-based proteins, beans are naturally low in fat, are free of saturated and trans-fat, and are a cholesterol free source of protein. Dietary research shows that a diet including beans may reduce your risk of heart disease and certain cancers.

BEANS reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.  Beans boast a low glycemic index and contain complex carbohydrates, which are digested slowly. These facts make beans a good choice for people needing to keep their blood sugar in the normal range.

BEANS encourages weight loss.  Beans are naturally low in fat, an excellent source of fiber, and a good source of protein. Research shows that people who eat more fiber tend to weigh less. Protein helps you feel full and promotes muscle building.

BEANS reduce cancer risk.  Beans are a natural source of antioxidants and phytochemicals. research reveals that a diet including beans may reduce your risk of certain cancers.

BEANS are great for pregnancy & healthy babies.  Folate, a vitamin very important for pregnant women and their unborn babies, is found in beans. During pregnancy, women need more folate. Expectant mothers who consume enough of the right nutrients can help reduce the risk of birth defects.

BEANS are great for heart health.  Unlike meat-based proteins, beans are naturally low in fat, are free of saturated fat and trans-fat, and are a cholesterol-free source of protein. Research shows that a diet including beans may reduce your risk of heart disease.

BEANS are a great alternative for food allergies.  Because beans don’t contain gluten, or major allergens found in various grains, substituting beans can help provide the fiber and other nutrients that people on restricted diets may be missing.

One serving of beans provides about 7 grams of fiber, which is half the average daily intake of US residents and about 25% of the recommended intake. Substituting just 1 cup of beans for animal food or refined grains could double fiber intake and help Americans meet their recommendations.

Mark Messina, “A Convenient Way to Increase Legume Intake”, Health Matters, Inform Magazine, February 2009.